The Batman series is AMAZING. You know what makes this series so amazing? Alfred. 

Alfred has always been one of my favorite characters…he’s just kind of awesome.

Alfred is the butler, friend and unsung hero. Every hero…every person…needs an Alfred in their life-someone who will call us out, is fiercely loyal, inspires us or saves us from ourselves. 

I love quotes–I love the power a sentence or a phrase or a word can have…and how something so small can grip your heart or motivate you to action. This is one of those quotes that gives me chills! And is said by Alfred of course…

We all are going to fall. Falling is painful. Sometimes things get broken on the way down. Sometimes they get so broken we don’t even think we can get back up.

But no matter how bad the fall…GET UP. Don’t quit. GET UP. Don’t let the fall defeat you…use it to make you stronger.

Falling hurts but it also teaches us, prepares us, motivates us, and makes us stronger. 

Every superhero has fallen, failed or experienced defeat….but we still call them heroes. Why? Because when they fell they got back up. 

Thank you Alfred for your words of wisdom!



The Lady with the Purple Streak in her Hair – True Story

Today I was going to write an entirely different blog post….about writing and love triangles…but I heard this true story today and felt I had to share it instead.

When she first walked into my office, I noticed she had silver hair….and a streak of it was dyed purple. Yes, purple. Not very common in most of the folks I’ve met over 50. This lady has a story to tell, I thought.

Her name often confused people. Lacy. It spoke of doilies, tea cups, frolicking in a field of daisies. People who knew her would often chuckle about the irony of her (of all people) owning such a name. She wasn’t dainty…and certainly never wore, never owned an article of clothing even touched with lace.

She was fire…ice…sharp…and when you weren’t ready for it that mouth of her’s would have you about crying your eyes out. Lacy would tell anyone exactly what she thought. There was no softening with her. If you asked her opinion (or didn’t ask), boy you’d get it and another thing coming.

Lacy was also known for something else. The way Micheal Phelps was created for swimming–a body literally made to slice through the water– she was made to make ivory keys sing. Music touches most of us and reaches to the deepest places in our hearts. But for Lacy, music–the piano, those black and white keys, were apart of her. Living without the piano was unimaginable. And gosh, was she a good pianist. Her fingers glided over those keys, and created music that would have you about crying your eyes out. (Lacy was good at making people come to tears one way or another…)

Rheumatoid Arthritis. 

The words just about knocked the wind out of her. But she was so young? Lacy studied the watery blue eyes of Doctor Paul, eyes hidden behind glasses so immense, so thick, she was sure he would be blind the moment he took them off. They held a look of pity which made a flash of anger shoot through her body. He reached out his hand and touched her shoulder, another gesture of pity. The shot of anger now become more of a steady stream pulsing through her body. She whipped her shoulder out of his clutches and stood up. “No, you’re wrong.”

“I’m so sorry, Lacy. Truly, I am from the bottom of my heart,” Dr. Paul said, his usually calm voice near cracking.

“I’m only 30 years old! You have made a mistake!” She could fill the anger flooding her cheeks, turning them red.

Dr. Paul looked down, shaking his head.

“You know what? I think I need to see another doctor, who ain’t as blind as a bat!” She grabbed her jacket while stomping towards the door. “You and those big, thick old glasses need to retire. But then you may need a job after how much you’ll be paying me when I sue you for giving me the wrong diagnosis!” Her anger fueled her out the door, past the shocked looks of nurses and patients who felt the floor tremble with how hard she slammed the door, and all the way through the parking lot of people who seemed to have made it their life’s mission to get in the way.

She sat in her car, her heart pounding. She turned on the ignition and gripped the steering wheel. “You’re gonna be fine, just fine. That old bag has no idea what he was talking about,” she told herself out loud. A twinge of guilt surfaced at the look on Dr. Paul’s face. He had been her doctor since she was little girl. She closed her eyes, forcing the vision out.

“You’ll be fine,” she whispered again, her eyes fixing to her hands as they gripped the steering wheel. She imagined the ivory keys of her baby grand, the cool feel of them beneath her fingers. “Just…fine.” She burst into tears.

Lacy, now 30 years later, said this was the moment where things got dark. For months and months she wallowed, despairing at the cruel dish life had given her to eat.

Then something happened. It was like a light shone into the blackness. She had a choice. “I was could crawl deeper into this black hole and die, or I was going to make the most of it.”

She chose to make the most of it. She said, “One thing I got from my father is determination. I couldn’t quit.”

Today, she dyes one streak of her hair purple for fun, she played the piano, and still played it beautifully (and still made people cry). In September she is moving to Africa for six months! She didn’t let the bad things in her life take charge of it. She also said her disease has made her more compassionate than she ever thought she could be, and in doing so perhaps saved many relationships she may have lost.

Charles Swindoll said, “I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it…we are in charge of our attitudes.” 

The Chain-a Poem

The Chain

A cloud of dust

Filled the air;

The chain of iron and rust

Clenched his bristled hair.

Iron links woven together

A collar made of spikes and of leather-

The iron links were his prison bars,

The collar of spikes his prison scars.

It was the only life he’d known

On the chain he had grown.

Back and forth

He paced each day.

Back and forth

Stomping dirt and clay.

All he wanted

Was to know

Just how fast

His legs could go.

To feel grass

Beneath his paws

To live one day

Without the chain’s laws.

Back and forth

He paced each day;

Back and forth

The years slipped away.

With each step

His anger burned

With each step

To hatred he turned.

Freedom was dangled

In front of his eyes

His master’s promises

Were nothing but lies.

A cloud of dust filled the air

The chain of iron and rust–

His despair.

He tensed his muscles and grunted

A little freedom was all he had ever wanted.

The chain was broken

With a cloud crack

He ran–

And didn’t look back.

His master’s anguished voice

Filled the air–

But he was long gone-

Never to return there.


Kaleel Jamison wrote: “Relationships – of all kinds – are like sand held in your hand. Held loosely, with an open hand, the sand remains where it is. The minute you close your hand and squeeze tightly to hold on, the sand trickles through your fingers. You may hold onto it, but most will be spilled. A relationship is like that. Held loosely, with respect and freedom for the other person, it is likely to remain intact. But hold too tightly, too possessively, and the relationship slips away and is lost.”

Everyone is afraid of something

Everyone is afraid of something.

This statement doesn’t seem true all the time. There are people I know who seem absolutely fearless– people that rush into situations most of us would pause at– they are the ones to stand up when no one else can– they are the ones who are willing to put their life on the line for their country, beliefs, or another person. Many times these are the people we call heroes.

Were these people, these heroes, just born with better genes….special DNA coding?

One of my fears is public speaking. Aahh! In school, I remember reading a report and shredding every last corner of it that wasn’t written on. My mind goes blank, I talk to fast, say “um” about a million times, and if it’s really bad my face turns red. Then I can feel it turn red…and that is all I can seem to think about. According to Forbes, only about 10% of the population LOVES public speaking…so I am not alone! This fact in itself is comforting.

I had a really great teacher growing up. She was crazy! Funny! Smart! Could connect with us all. And she definitely wasn’t afraid of speaking in front of a crowd.  I will never forget the day she confessed to the class that in her younger years she was gravely shy. We were all like, “No, look at you…full of jokes!” But it was the truth. She said on the first day of her being a teacher, she felt almost sick because she was so scared. She stuttered, her hands shook, and at the end of the day she wanted to cry. What if she made a huge mistake in wanting to be a teacher? But, everyday she went back…everyday she faced her fear…and slowly, with each day it got a little easier. She kept meeting that fear and slowly she conquered it.

Nelson Mandela said, “I learned that courage isn’t the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.”

Everyone is afraid of something. Even those people that seem fearless.Heroes are people that chose to face their fears, that believe whatever is on the other side of their fear is more important.We are all human, and we all have fears. Whether your fear is something big or small, don’t let fear rule your life. Don’t let your fear hold you back! Don’t let fear keep you from accomplishing your dreams!